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Fermented Vegetables: Healing Foods, Probiotics & Recipes

Fermented Vegetables: Healing Foods, Probiotics & Recipes

The Healing Power of Fermented Vegetables & Probiotics

On This Week in America with host Ric Bratton, I cover The ABCs of Probiotics, Prebiotics, Digestive Enzymes & Fermented Veggies. You'll learn how these all help with weight loss, dental health, immunity, colds and flu, arthritis, allergies, ADHD, and depression, which ones offer the best potency, purity, and efficacy, and how to order them. Click HERE to listen.

To learn about the best probiotic supplement capsule (E3Probiotics 50 Billion) that I take daily and it doesn't need refrigeration, click HERE.

The water I use when making my organic, fermented veggies is with the purified, alkaline water from my Ionizer Plus Water Electrolyzer.



What are fermented vegetables?

There was a time in the not-so-distant past when homemade jars of pickled vegetables such as cucumbers, cabbage, beets, and onions were a common sight in American kitchens. It was a way to preserve the bounty of the season, making sure extra vegetables didn't spoil or go to waste, and assured that tangy condiments were always on hand. This was before modern canning made it more convenient to simply pick up a mass-produced can of so-and-so at the grocery store.


In America and Europe, cucumber pickles and sauerkraut (cabbage) are two of the most popular fermented vegetables. Fermented veggies can also be found in other cultures around the world, including spicy kimchi (fermented cabbage) in Korea and colorful curtido (cabbage, onions, carrots) in Latin America. Fermentation is not limited to veggies only - fermented dairy (kefir, yogurt or sour cream) is very popular throughout Central and Eastern Europe, or fermented fish (mackerel, Swedish gravlax) is home to areas across the northern European coastlines. In Asia, miso and natto represent other highly beneficial fermented foods, miso even helps with radiation removal. What all of these culinary treats share in common is that the vegetables undergo a process known as lacto-fermentation. When fermentation occurs, the sugars and carbohydrates in a food are converted into a new form. For example, fruit juice becomes wine, grains transform into beer, and vegetable sugars change into preservative organic acids that extend the shelf life of the vegetables. Sourdough also draws on fermentation, with the end result of a delicious homemade bread. As a process, fermentation multiplies vitamin C content and facilitates creating and absorption of group B vitamins.

TIP: One of my favorite health-enriching snacks is a small bowl or plate filled with a bed of organic leafy greens, then topped with some fermented veggies. I have this salubrious snack frequently.

Vegetables are traditionally fermented with salt and water. When immersed in brine, any harmful bacteria are killed off, assuring that the food is preserved safely. At the same time, beneficial bacteria − particularly lactobacillus organisms − flourish and convert sugars in the food into lactic acid. This creates an acidic environment that discourages any harmful bacteria from proliferating. It's also what gives fermented veggies their signature pungent flavor.

The beneficial bacteria in fermented veggies confer these nutrient-dense foods of nature with myriad health benefits. The lactobacilli enhance the vegetables' digestibility and increase vitamin levels. They produce helpful enzymes as well as antibiotic and anti-carcinogenic substances. Furthermore, these probiotic bacteria have numerous benefits in the digestive tract that promote whole-body health — our bodies are made up of 10 times as many bacteria as human cells, interacting in myriad of still not fully appreciated ways. Proper immune response depends on a healthy gut and having the right microbial balance enables us to deal with everyday health challenges as easily as possible. 

What is a probiotic?

Typically, when we think of bacteria, we tend to associate these microorganisms with pathogenic or infectious outcomes. But not all bacteria are created equal! Yes, some strains of bacteria, like E. coli, are bad guys, while other strains like L. acidophilus are actually good guys. The latter are known as probiotics, or beneficial bacteria. Consuming probiotics in our diets can help keep our digestive and immune systems running smoothly.

Historically, live bacteria were commonly eaten in food. There is archeological evidence that mankind has used lacto-fermentation as a way of preserving food dating back 1.5 million years. Scientists believe that the human GI tract evolved to adapt to a more or less daily supply of live lactic acid bacteria. We're designed to consume copious amounts of probiotics!

However, with the advent of food refrigeration, pasteurization, and other processing, the ingestion of microorganisms has decreased. In the United States today, we consume very few fermented food products, such as yogurt and sauerkraut. Sterilization of our food supply has limited our potential to ingest beneficial organisms previously consumed on a daily basis − and this may be part of the reason why so many Americans suffer from chronic gut disturbances.

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the largest contact points between our bodies and the environment. Not only does it serve to physically and chemically break down the foods we consume, it also serves as a barrier to harmful substances which may enter the body through oral consumption. In order to perform these functions properly, the GI tract relies upon a complex ecosystem of bacteria. The composition of this ecosystem, or flora “fingerprint,” is set in childhood and is unique to every individual. Once the flora “fingerprint” is established, those specific types of bacteria are then recognized as normal throughout our lives. The immune system is established in such a way that the body is able to distinguish between these good microorganisms and perilous invaders.

The balance of bacteria in the gut can be disturbed due to a number of factors, including diet, disease, stress, chemotherapy, medications (primarily antibiotics), personal hygiene products, house cleaners and environmental pollution (air, water and food quality, additives, preservatives, heavy metals, GMOs etc) in general. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially when used over the long term, can knock out many of the normal beneficial flora, setting the stage for the proliferation of competing, possibly disease-causing organisms that are often resistant to these agents. Accompanying them with regular, simultaneous probiotics intake helps to mitigate this unfortunate effect. Anyway, a good start is to avoid processed foods, refined sugars and high-fructose corn syrup - it is the first building block of a healthy gut – nutritionally void sugars promote bad bacteria and Candida yeast growth at the expense of good bacteria that help us in the digestive process.

Pathogenic organisms are always present to some extent in the GI tract. In a normal, healthy state, the beneficial bacteria outnumber these potentially harmful bacteria (the ratio is 85% helpful bacteria to 15% harmful bacteria). When the beneficial and harmful bacteria levels become imbalanced, this is referred to as dysbiosis, which can lead to episodes of digestive upsets in the short term and set the stage for the development of conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and deadly antibiotic-associated diarrhea from C. difficile infection.

When we add fermented products such as fermented veggies to our diets, we can boost our consumption of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, which can replace harmful organisms in the digestive tract with helpful ones and keep the healthy balance intact. The first to discover this possibility was the Russian scientist and Nobel laureate Eli Metchnikoff, who in 1908 hypothesized that eating fermented milk products improved the health and lifespan of Bulgarian peasants (many of them lived to be 100 years old!). Metchnikoff concluded that consuming fermented milk helped to “seed” the intestine with friendly bacteria, thereby suppressing the growth of harmful bacteria. Consuming fermented veggies can do the same.

Consuming fermented foods regularly can apart from correcting digestive issues also positively influence heart disease, blood pressure, arthritis, food allergies, obesity, gum disease, our mood, overall detoxification and much more. Probiotics help in more efficient digestion, enabling us to get more out of the foods we eat. Even mere nibbling of a fermented side dish in the course of a regular meal makes a huge difference to the digestive process. In as little as 24 hours, significant differences in the the gut flora composition can be detected.

E3Probiotics 50 Billion Enhanced with E3AFA Vegan, non-GMO, Gluten-Free, No Refrigeration Required

E3Probiotics 50 Billion Enhanced with E3AFA — is an all natural, non-GMO, herbicide- and pesticide-free probiotics that are formulated to assist your body in gut health, gut swelling and immune health. Beneficial intestinal floras can be depleted by the diets high in sugar, meats, and low in fiber, or by medication taken for illness and infections. This may result in a disruption of your normal intestinal microflora. When normal microflora is disrupted, it can affect your well-being and digestion. It's the best-of-the-best — a 50 Billion Count Bacteria with E3AFA added into the blend in a Delayed Release Acid-Resistance Vegetable Capsule. Click HERE for more info or to order.
I take this natural, efficacious probiotic daily!

 

Proper immune response helps stop excessive, chronic inflammation, the root cause of arthritis, in the tracks. “Killer cells” production is activated and increased by friendly gut bacteria. Low level of these allies of our immune system is common among type II diabetes sufferers.

The brain-gut link is also not fully appreciated, with one influencing the other and vice versa - UCLA associate professor of medicine Dr. Kirsten Tillisch said, "Time and time again, we hear from patients that they never felt depressed or anxious until they started experiencing problems with their gut.” It has been demonstrated that consumption of fermented products results in better task related responses, corresponding with increased cortex activity and mid-brain instrument neurotransmitter pathway improvements. Our gut literally serves as oour second brain, and even produces more of the neurotransmitter serotonin.

What are the health benefits of consuming fermented vegetables?

Fermented vegetables are an outstanding way to add more probiotics to your diet. Many people choose not to consume fermented dairy products such as yogurt and kefir due to lactose intolerance or vegan diets, so fermented veggies are an ideal alternative.

Once consumed, the probiotics from fermented veggies have many potential benefits. Probiotics help synthesize vitamins, produce digestive enzymes, and aid with the absorption of nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, and iron. Beneficial bacteria help maintain the integrity of the gut lining so that harmful organisms and toxins do not pass into the bloodstream. Probiotics in the gut also work to prevent harmful bacteria from colonizing the GI tract by competing directly for space and crowding out pathogens. They produce a variety of substances that can inhibit, or even kill, potentially harmful bacteria. In addition, they stimulate the immune system and the secretion of immunoglobulin A, a very important molecule in preventing infection. The health benefits appear to be limitless.

Here are some of the many ways researchers have found probiotics to benefit health:

  • Reduce the risk of inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer
  • Protect against antibiotic-associated and infectious diarrhea
  • Prevent and alleviate allergies
  • Promote weight loss
  • Guard against urinary tract and vaginal infections in women
  • Improve skin health
  • Help with diabetes type II, increasing insulin sensitivity
  • Improve psychic disorders (depression, anxiety, autism, ADHD, dyslexia and schizophrenia)
  • Relieve headaches (eaten on an empty stomach)
  • Better connect the enteric nervous system (located in the abdominal region around the gut) and the central nervous system
  • Improve detoxification abilities of our bodies

What are some studies that demonstrate the health benefits of fermented veggies?

While there are thousands of studies that demonstrate the health benefits of probiotics and probiotic foods in general, recently researchers have been turning their attention to the specific benefits of fermented vegetables, especially kimchi.


A study in the Journal of Nutrition Research showed that regular consumption of fermented kimchi can lead to weight loss and improve metabolic markers of cardiovascular disease such as blood pressure and cholesterol in overweight individuals. Participants ate unfermented kimchi for four weeks and then switched to fermented kimchi for another four weeks. The benefits in weight loss and other cardiovascular markers occurred during the fermented phase. The researchers concluded that fermentation − either the bacteria that causes it or the changes in the food that result − was responsible for the observed health benefits (Kim, E. K., et al). 


Another study published in the Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering clarified that the fermentation process of kimchi does indeed make profound changes in the healing potential of the vegetable. The researchers found that the longer kimchi fermented, the higher the antioxidant levels. Therefore, not only are the probiotic bacteria involved in fermentation health promoting, but so too are the changes that occur in the fermented vegetable itself (Park, J. M. et al).


A study in the Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism examined the effects of fermented kimchi consumption on pre-diabetic individuals. Participants ate fermented kimchi for eight weeks and unfermented kimchi for eight weeks. While consumption of both types of kimchi decreased body weight, body mass index, and waist circumference, consumption of fermented kimchi significantly decreased insulin resistance and blood pressure and increased insulin sensitivity. 33.3% of participants showed improved glucose tolerance after consuming fermented kimchi as compared to 9% after consuming unfermented kimchi (An, S. Y., et al). 


Taken together, these studies suggest that fermentation "turbo boosts" the health benefits of vegetables, which are already nutritional storehouses. Fermentation increases the antioxidant levels as well as imparts probiotic bacteria. In kimchi, this combination of factors has scientifically been proven to help maintain healthy blood sugar, keep blood pressure and cholesterol in check, and reduce excess weight. 

How do I choose a fermented vegetable product?

Purchasing fermented vegetables can be a little confusing. Pickles, for example, are typically lactic-acid fermented. However, "shelf-stable" pickles you find in the grocery store do not have the same benefits as naturally fermented pickles because high-heat pasteurization and vinegar used to prolong the shelf life halt the fermentation and enzymatic processes. Similarly, mass-produced olives are generally not fermented. Instead, they are treated with lye to remove the bitterness and canned in an acidic solution of lactic acid, acetic acid, sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate instead of a simple salt brine. Healthy fermented products (be it veggies or dairy) are simply not suitable for mass-production and modern food distribution systems. The shelf life, mark-up, and costs of distribution of the unadulterated product disqualify it from making it onto retail shelves.

Therefore, whenever possible, choose naturally fermented vegetables. This might include pickled cucumbers, beets, onions, sauerkraut, kimchi, and even fermented salsa or mayonnaise. Typically, vegetables that still have active beneficial bacteria have a stronger and tangier flavor (not counting any added garlic or hot pepper) than their pasteurized counterparts.

How can I make fermented vegetables at home?

If you're serious about your fermented veggies, an easy and economical way to load up on them is to learn the art of fermentation at home. The ingredients and equipment are simple: all you need are some fresh (preferably organic!) vegetables, a clean jar, (un-chlorinated, un-fluoridated) water, and salt (preferably sea salt or other salt free of iodine and/or anti-caking agents, which can inhibit fermentation).

Chop up the vegetables of your choice and make a brine (3 tablespoons salt for every quart of water). You can also use mineral-rich salt substitutes such as celery juice. Starter cultures of whey, kefir grains, or freeze-dried vegetables can also be used as an alternative to salt. Add vegetables and any herbs or spices to the jar, cover completely with brine or celery juice, and then close the jar to let the lactic-acid bacteria do their thing. Store at room temperature during the fermentation process.

Early on in the fermentation process, once a day, open the jar, gently pressing the veggies with a clean fork to release the gases produced by fermentation (do a little taste test if you wish). Having done so once or twice, be careful not to expose your veggies to any more oxygen (fermentation is an anaerobic process – you do not want vinegar formed, a little tang is achieved without vinegar formation). If any mold forms at the top of the jar (this is common, especially in hot weather), simply scrape it away. However, remember that mold can really make you sick and you have no easy way of telling the type and how your body would react – so why the risk (this is even truer when the veggie becomes mushy)? On the other hand, moderate whitish sediment formation after a week at the bottom of the jar is not a reason to be concerned - it happens naturally e.g. with gherkins.

When the veggies are pungent enough for your liking, transfer the jar to the refrigerator and enjoy! Remember that fermentation is a long process and the composition of bacteria in your product changes with time, so do not hurry to refrigerate and consume it immediately – different strains of helpful bacteria need different time to develop – e.g. so your sauerkraut shouldn't be refrigerated between 3 and 10 days after packing your jar, if you want maximum probiotics content. Refrigeration slows the fermentation process so if you have to move your ferment to the fridge after a few days, be at least very patient and keep it refrigerated at a minimum for several weeks so that fermentation can proceed, albeit at a considerably slower pace. Also, think about not putting your jars to the coldest rack in your fridge so as not to slow the process.

Here are some additional tips on fermenting your own veggies:

  • When using cabbage, go for heads that are hard and heavy, with densely packed leaves. Lighter, leafier varieties don't hold up as well during fermentation.
  • Get creative with your veggie combinations! (Suggestions below.)
  • Peel your vegetables as the skins can add a bitter flavor.
  • When adding aromatics, such as garlic and ginger, a little goes a long way. Remember that fermenting intensifies the pungent flavor.
  • Especially peppers, and to a lesser degree onions, tend to be overpowering, so use them sparingly in your process.
  • When adding herbs, use fresh or dried organic herbs, in small amounts. Tasty additions include: basil, sage, rosemary, thyme, cumin, dill and oregano.
  • Add sea vegetables or seaweed to increase the mineral, vitamin, and fiber content.
  • Cover your veggies with brine so that they are fully immersed.
  • Fermentation depends on ambient temperature – during summer, veggies are typically “done” in three to four days. In the winter, they may need up to seven days. This will not maximize the probiotics content but it’s a good start anyway and as you learn with time, you can gradually prolong the time to prepare it. It also comes down to the particular type of veggie you are fermenting – each needs different time. Consuming fully fermented veggies is especially important if you are trying to heal your gut imbalances – and this can be achieved only with sufficiently long fermentation process.

Here are some ideas for tasty fermented veggie combinations: (From http://www.jadeinstitute.com/jade/restoring-digestive-health-with-fermen...)

  • Turnips, Radishes, Carrots: Slice them into planks or chunks and cover with brine. Try these with dill seed and garlic or with mustard seed and red pepper flakes. Turnips tend to be a bit spicy when fermented, but are great on salads.
  • Beets: Beet and carrots together create a thick, sweet and deep red liquid and the vegetables are deliciously tender, sour, and sweet.
  • Green Beans or Asparagus: Trim the veggies to fit in the jar and add a garlic clove and maybe a small, dried red chili. Try doing the same with okra.
  • Mushrooms: White or baby 'bella mushrooms can be pickled in brine into a very tasty appetizer. Try adding black peppercorns and mustard seed, as well as a small garlic clove.
  • Summer Relish: Use corn, chopped green tomato, red bell pepper, and onion with mustard seeds. It takes a month or so for the flavor to develop but is fantastic.
  • Pickled Garlic: Peel the cloves, fill the jar and cover with brine. It will take 4-5 months for the cloves to ferment fully but it will be worth it. They ferment into a mellow, garlicky, almost sweet tangy condiment. Perfect for salad dressings and topping soup.

Here's a tasty recipe from Stewart Golomb of natural purveyor MoonBrine Pickles for "Fennelimoncello" − a citrusy ferment with thinly sliced fennel, lemon, carrots, celery and onion.

Vegetables:

  • 2 to 3 heads fennel, thinly sliced
  • 2 to 3 spring onions or other sweet onion, thinly sliced
    3 carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 3 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 1 to 2 lemons, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns

Brine:

  • 8 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 6 cups cold water

To make the vegetables: Combine the fennel, onion, carrot, celery, lemon, garlic and peppercorns in a glass or plastic 6- to 8-quart container.

To prepare the brine: In a large bowl or measuring cup, dissolve the salt in the water. Pour the brine over the vegetables. Make sure there is enough brine to cover the vegetables by at least 3 inches. Put a plate on top of the vegetables in order to weigh them down and keep them below the water line. (Keeping your vegetables submerged during the fermentation process is very important)

Allow to ferment at room temperature for 1 week, tasting them periodically as they ferment. When finished, pack into jars, along with the brine and refrigerate for up to 4 weeks.

What are some ideas for incorporating fermented veggies into my diet?

Now that you know how to choose or make your own fermented vegetables, you're probably wondering about how to best enjoy them with a meal. A quarter or half cup of fermented veggies one to three times a day is recommended for optimum health benefits. Here are some ideas:

  • Add fermented radishes to a salad for tangy zip
  • Dip chips into spicy fermented salsa
  • Zest up your barbecue with sauerkraut and fermented pickles as condiments
  • Try pickled green beans and carrots as a cool summer side dish
  • Top your sandwich with crunchy, shredded fermented cabbage
  • Add kimchi to an Asian-themed meal of grilled meat or seafood and rice
  • Spoon curtido onto taco
  • Spice up your soups

 

Two Fermented Vegetable Recipes from Petr in the Czech Republic

RECIPE 1

Utensils:
1 mason jar of a 30-ounce capacity size (or any type of air-tight jar — recommendation – use at least 5 jars per batch and multiply the below amounts accordingly)
  
Vegetables and spices:

  • 18 ounces red beet (not too thinly sliced)
  • 1 medium-to-big onion (thinly sliced)
  • 1 small-to-medium carrot (not mature, not too thinly sliced)
  • 2 pieces whole dried capsicum (without the green tops but with seeds)
  • 2-3 garlic cloves (sliced)
  • 1 tablespoon dried basil (or fresh basil)
  • 1 tablespoon dried fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon cumin (preferably ground)

Brine:
8 teaspoons (such as Himalayan, Celtic or other non-processed, non-iodized sea salt)
Several cups cold filtered water to fully submerge the veggies in the jar (I use purified, alkaline water from my Ionizer Plus device)

To make the vegetables: Combine red beet, onion, carrot and garlic in the jar (either have them in layers or shake them a bit so as to mix them well — do not squeeze them tightly in). Position capsicum vertically to the opposite sides of the jar, put the spices in, and finish with the last layer of red beet. The jar should be full of veggies with the top 1 1/4 inch area remaining empty (if you have more room in your jar due to its slightly bigger size, add more red beet until you have the jar full except the top 1 1/4 inch area).

To prepare the brine: Add salt to the top of your veggies in the jar and pour in water till it reaches approximately 2/3 inch from the top. Gently shake so that the salt moves around in the jar. Lightly press the veggies down with a fork so that any potential air pockets disappear. Your veggies are fully submerged.  

Cover the jar with a lid, do not close overly tightly. Allow to ferment at room temperature (75°F is ideal) for 1 week. After the first 24 hours, open the jar and using a fork, gently and lightly press the veggies down — you will see small bubbles running to the surface. Close the lid tightly.

After the next 24 hours, again gently press the veggies down with the fork so as to release gas. Close the lid tightly. After the next 48 hours, press the veggies down with the fork for the last time — not much gas is making it to the surface. Refrigerate for up to 6 weeks. After the first week of refrigeration passes, you can start consuming your fermented veggies. It is natural and not detrimental to the product quality that after several weeks of refrigeration the fermented liquid gradually becomes more and more slimy.

If your room temperature is markedly higher than 75°F, let it ferment at room temperature for 2-4 days only, shorten the intervals of the fork procedure accordingly, and prolong the refrigeration period before consumption by at least 10 days.
 
RECIPE 2

Utensils:
1 mason jar of 30-ounce capacity size (or any type of air-tight jar recommendation — use at least 7 of these jars per batch and multiply the below amounts accordingly)
    
Vegetables and spices:
14 ounces of gherkins — a small variety of cucumber (cut in halves or quarters, lengthwise)
1 medium-to-big onion (thinly sliced)
7 ounces of zucchini (not too thinly sliced)
3 garlic cloves (sliced)
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 tablespoon cumin
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon dried dill (or fresh)
1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
2 whole allspice
2 fresh bay leaves

Brine:
8 teaspoons (Himalayan, Celtic or other non-processed, non-iodized sea salt
Several cups cold filtered water to fully submerge the veggies in the jar (I use purified, alkaline water from my Ionizer Plus device)


To make the vegetables: Be sure to wash the gherkins and zucchini thoroughly and meticulously (cut the green tops off). Stuff the gherkins and zucchini vertically (layer by layer so that zucchini is rather evenly spread around) in the jar (no pressure, do not squeeze them). Add spices (position bay leaves vertically to the opposite sides of the jar), sprinkle with onions and garlic, add another layer of cut gherkins (depending on your jar dimension, it can be horizontally, involving further cutting) — do not press or squeeze tightly in. The jar should be full of veggies with the top 1 1/2 inch area remaining empty (if you have more room in your jar due to its slightly bigger size, add more cut gherkins until you have the jar full apart from the top 1 1/2 inch area).

To prepare the brine: Add salt to the top of your veggies in the jar and pour in water until it reaches approximately 3/4 inch from the top. Gently shake so that the salt moves around in the jar. Lightly press the veggies down with a fork so that any potential air pockets disappear. Your veggies are fully submerged. 

Cover the jar with a lid, do not close overly tightly. Allow to ferment at room temperature (75°F is ideal) for 1 week. After the first 24-48 hours, open the jar and using a fork, gently lightly press the veggies down — you will see small bubbles running to the surface. Close the lid tightly. After the next 48 hours, again gently press the veggies down with the fork so as to release gas — less gas is making it to the surface. Refrigerate.

After 3-4 weeks, check for white sediment and whitish, not murky liquid color presence — almost none to only a thin layer sediment is the desired result. If you get a different result (quite common within the same batch – how thoroughly you wash the gherkins is one of the success factors), open the jar and check gherkin consistency — if mushy and disintegrating from the inside, discard the whole contents of the jar. Keep refrigerated. If you prefer, you can start eating from your successful jars (one by one, of course).

Alternatively, if you want to allow for more well-rounded fermentation, check after another 6 weeks of refrigeration for any white sediment and whitish, not murky liquid color presence — just as you did before. Ideally, the liquid has little to no white sediment and is fully transparent with a possible slightly brownish hue due to the spices present. Periodically check and consume no later than after 8 months, preferably earlier (8 months highlights the possibilities to consume crispy gherkins all-year-round and is by no means guaranteed). However, you should be able to easily make it through the winter with your fresh, fermented gherkins ready in the fridge, if starting towards the end of harvest season for gherkins in your area.

If your room temperature is markedly higher than 75°F, let it ferment at room temperature for 2-4 days only, shorten the intervals of the fork procedure accordingly, and prolong the refrigeration period before consumption by at least 10 days. In this case, do not count on great success rate with longer-term storage and in general, consider consuming your fermented gherkins earlier than it is the case with a more suitable ambient temperature. Enjoy!

E3Probiotics 50 Billion Enhanced with E3AFA Vegan, non-GMO, Gluten-Free, No Refrigeration Required

E3Probiotics 50 Billion Enhanced with E3AFA — is an all natural, non-GMO, herbicide- and pesticide-free probiotics that are formulated to assist your body in gut health, gut swelling and immune health. Beneficial intestinal floras can be depleted by the diets high in sugar, meats, and low in fiber, or by medication taken for illness and infections. This may result in a disruption of your normal intestinal microflora. When normal microflora is disrupted, it can affect your well-being and digestion. It's the best-of-the-best — a 50 Billion Count Bacteria with E3AFA added into the blend in a Delayed Release Acid-Resistance Vegetable Capsule. Click HERE for more info or to order.
I take this natural, efficacious probiotic daily!

 

 

 

References

Kimchi research studies:

  • An, S. Y., Lee, M. S., Jeon, J. Y., Ha, E. S., Kim, T. H., Yoon, J. Y., ... & Lee, K. W. (2013). Beneficial effects of fresh and fermented kimchi in prediabetic individuals. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 63(1-2), 111-119.
  • Kim, E. K., An, S. Y., Lee, M. S., Kim, T. H., Lee, H. K., Hwang, W. S., ... & Lee, K. W. (2011). Fermented kimchi reduces body weight and improves metabolic parameters in overweight and obese patients. Nutrition Research, 31(6), 436-443.
  • Park, J. M., Shin, J. H., Gu, J. G., Yoon, S. J., Song, J. C., Jeon, W. M., ... & Kim, J. M. (2011). Effect of antioxidant activity in kimchi during a short-term and over-ripening fermentation period. Journal of bioscience and bioengineering, 112(4), 356-359.

Good online resources:

  • http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/01/fermented-vegetables.aspx
  • http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/01/03/fermented-foods-part-two.aspx
  • http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/15/caroline-barringer-interview.aspx
  • http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fermented-foods-health/#ixzz1jrwWeNoe
  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/grace-suh-coscia-lac-diplom/fermented-foods_b_1220756.html
  • http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-naturally-culture-ferment-vegetables
  • http://www.wildfermentation.com/vegetable-fermentation-further-simplified-2/
  • http://www.nourishingdays.com/2009/07/the-benefits-of-fermented-food-lacto-fermented-vegetables/
  • http://www.jadeinstitute.com/jade/restoring-digestive-health-with-fermented-foods.php
  • Natural News - Detoxing your gut can help you avoid Type 2 diabetes, according to scientists
  • Natural News - Studies show many health benefits from eating fermented foods
  • Natural News - More studies prove your gut bacteria control your brain functioning
  • Natural News - Probiotics transform emotional response and affect your brain activity
  • Dr Mercola - How to Easily and Inexpensively Ferment Your Own Vegetables
  • Dr. Natasha Campbell-Mcbride - "Gut and Psychology Syndrome. Natural treatment for autism, ADHD/ADD, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia."
  • Kristen Michaelis - The 3 Biggest Fermenting Mistakes You’re Already Making
  • www.nourishingtreasures.com
  • Sandor Katz - Vegetable Fermentation Further Simplified
  • www.zivost.cz - Kvašená zelenina
  • www.dobreazdravo.sk - Kvasená zelenina – pickles
  • Simona Procházková - Znáte pickles? Kvašená zelenina dokáže divy



The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature imagination of a man is healthy; but there is a space of life between, in which the soul is in a ferment, the character undecided, the way of life uncertain, the ambition thick-sighted: thence proceeds mawkishness.
~ John Keats

We can get fuel from fruit, from that shrub by the roadside, or from apples, weeds, saw-dust — almost anything! There is fuel in every bit of vegetable matter that can be fermented. There is enough alcohol in one year's yield of a hectare of potatoes to drive the machinery necessary to cultivate the field for a hundred years. And it remains for someone to find out how this fuel can be produced commercially — better fuel at a cheaper price than we know now.
~ Henry Ford

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